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Happy Story,Tree House Expands, Canned Imports and Donald Glover - Beer Links for Monday

Craft Beer is the Strangest Happiest Economic Story in America - Derek Thompson at the The Atlantic tries to make sense of trends in the craft beer business.  The good guys seem to be winning.  What gives? 

Upcoming Improvements to the Tree House Experience - Yes, less than a year after their expansion,
Tree house is doing it again - sort of.  The house that New England IPA built will see additions adding more serving, sitting, and sheltered space to queue.  There are even rumors of a return to growler pours.  All good news from Charleton. 

Tanks for All the Beer - B. United Rewrites the rules for Importing - Shipment across the ocean changes beer.  B. United shares some of their secrets to keeping beer fresh, and competitive with shiny cans and fresh at the brewery consumption.

Donald Glover Can't Save You - A thoughtful, and lengthy look into the mind of one of America's creative polymaths.  I know it's off topic, save a rather disparaging I.P.A. joke but I really haven't taken a trip into a creative's thought process quite this interesting for a long time.  I'm not even sure Mr. Glover wants to acknowledge the illusions he dispels. 

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